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echo : 22.08 UTC – Zu stän­digen Erin­ne­rung > Meryl Streep’s Golden Globe Speach, 8. Januar 2017 : Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screa­ming and lamen­ta­tion this weekend. And I have lost my mind some­time earlier this year, so I have to read. Thank you, Holly­wood Foreign Press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said: You and all of us in this room really belong to the most vili­fied segments in American society right now. Think about it: Holly­wood, foreig­ners, and the press. / But who are we, and what is Holly­wood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places. I was born and raised and educated in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Caro­lina, came up in Central Falls, Rhode Island; Sarah Paulson was born in Florida, raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids in Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Vicenza, Italy. And Natalie Portman was born in Jeru­salem. Where are their birth certi­fi­cates? And the beau­tiful Ruth Negga was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, raised in London — no, in Ireland I do believe, and she’s here nomi­nated for playing a girl in small-town Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all of the nicest people, is Cana­dian, and Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, and is here playing an Indian raised in Tasmania. So Holly­wood is craw­ling with outsi­ders and foreig­ners. And if we kick them all out you’ll have nothing to watch but foot­ball and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. / They gave me three seconds to say this, so: An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are diffe­rent from us, and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful perfor­mances this year that did exactly that. Breath­ta­king, compas­sio­nate work. But there was one perfor­mance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good; there was nothing good about it. But it was effec­tive and it did its job. It made its intended audi­ence laugh, and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter. Someone he outranked in privi­lege, power and the capa­city to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it, and I still can’t get it out of my head, because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. And this instinct to humi­liate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public plat­form, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kinda gives permis­sion for other people to do the same thing. Disre­spect invites disre­spect, violence incites violence. And when the powerful use their posi­tion to bully others we all lose. O.K., go on with it. O.K., this brings me to the press. We need the princi­pled press to hold power to account, to call him on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our foun­ders enshrined the press and its free­doms in the Consti­tu­tion. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Holly­wood Foreign Press and all of us in our commu­nity to join me in suppor­ting the Committee to Protect Jour­na­lists, because we’re gonna need them going forward, and they’ll need us to safe­guard the truth. One more thing: Once, when I was stan­ding around on the set one day, whining about some­thing — you know we were gonna work through supper or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a privi­lege, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is, and we have to remind each other of the privi­lege and the respon­si­bi­lity of the act of empathy. We should all be proud of the work Holly­wood honors here tonight. / As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art. – stop / fundort

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