Schlagwort: suppe

///

zeitoun

pic

whis­key : 9.35 UTC — In den letz­ten 10 Tagen des Okto­ber­mo­nats lern­te mei­ne Schreib­ma­schi­ne fol­gen­de Wör­ter, die in ihren Prüf­ver­zeich­nis­sen bis­lang nicht zu fin­den gewe­sen waren: Abstand­si­gna­le . Aqua­re­lia . Bang­sein . Bir­dy . Brief­tau­ben­wör­ter . Camar . Care­con . Clus­ter­su­che . Con­ta­gi­on . Coro­na­si­mu­la­ti­on . Droh­nen­au­ge . Droh­nen­sich­tung . Droh­nen­vo­gel . Droll­bir­ne . Ebo­la­vi­rus . Eich­hörn­chen­schat­ten . Fin­ger­cur­ser . Ina­ri. Inzi­denz. Jennifer.five . Koli­bri­we­sen . Kro­ko­dil­mo­dell . Kür­bis­sup­pe . Libel­len­lar­ven . Loo­ters . luren . Mee­res­ge­wäch­se . Mee­res­we­sen . Mon­roe . Mund­schutz­al­go­rith­mus . Nacht­schiff­tag . neu­ro­nal . Palan­ca . Pan­de­mieto­te . Pan­de­mie­zeit . Par­ti­cles­zei­chen . Pfuhl­schnep­fe . Ple­xi­glas­schei­ben . Resi­li­enz . Rotkopf­schild­krö­ten . Sars-Cov‑2 . Sars­lämp­chen . Schiff­pen­del­be­we­gung . Schlaf­durch­ein­an­der­zeit . See­ane­mo­nen­blü­te . See­tang­klum­pen . Spät­abend­men­schen . Spel­ling . Super­do­me­hal­le . Süß­was­serane­mo­ne . Tän­zer­ra­ver . Teil­lock­down . Tress­pass­an­gers . Vak­zin . War­logs . Wort­kern­bil­der . Zat­te­re . Zeito­un . Zep­pe­lin­werk­statt . Zep­pe­lin­wol­ken. — stop
ping

///

luftgang

pic

echo : 15.12 UTC — Ein­mal, abends, begin­ne ich Natha­lie Sar­rau­tes Kind­heit zum zwei­ten Male zu lesen. Das Buch beglei­tet mich seit Jah­ren. Wun­der­voll, wie sich ihre Geschich­ten Lebe­we­sen gleich von den Sei­ten lösen. Das Mäd­chen, das so lan­ge kaut, bis alles in ihrem Mund befind­li­che zu Sup­pe gewor­den ist. Wie das­sel­be Mäd­chen die Luft anhält an einer Stra­ßen­kreu­zung war­tend, um dem Essig­ge­ruch ihres Kin­der­mäd­chens zu ent­ge­hen. Wie sie einen Tele­gra­fen­mast berührt, und glaubt zu ster­ben. Wie sie bemerkt, dass die Mut­ter sich nicht in sie hin­ein­zu­set­zen ver­moch­te. Wie sie der Mut­ter einen Löf­fel Staub reicht, um ein Geschwis­ter­chen zu bekom­men. — Auch ich habe heu­te mehr­fach die Luft ange­hal­ten, um dem Atem pas­sie­ren­der Men­schen zu ent­ge­hen. — stop
ping

///

transcript

9

echo : 22.08 UTC — Zu stän­di­gen Erin­ne­rung > Meryl Streep’s Gol­den Glo­be Speach, 8. Janu­ar 2017 : Plea­se sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to for­gi­ve me. I’ve lost my voice in screa­ming and lamen­ta­ti­on this wee­kend. And I have lost my mind some­time ear­lier this year, so I have to read. Thank you, Hol­ly­wood For­eign Press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Lau­rie said: You and all of us in this room real­ly belong to the most vili­fied seg­ments in Ame­ri­can socie­ty right now. Think about it: Hol­ly­wood, for­eig­ners, and the press. / But who are we, and what is Hol­ly­wood any­way? It’s just a bunch of peop­le from other pla­ces. I was born and rai­sed and edu­ca­ted in the public schools of New Jer­sey. Vio­la was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Caro­li­na, came up in Cen­tral Falls, Rho­de Island; Sarah Paul­son was born in Flo­ri­da, rai­sed by a sin­gle mom in Brook­lyn. Sarah Jes­si­ca Par­ker was one of seven or eight kids in Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Vicen­za, Ita­ly. And Nata­lie Port­man was born in Jeru­sa­lem. Whe­re are their birth cer­ti­fi­ca­tes? And the beau­ti­ful Ruth Neg­ga was born in Addis Aba­ba, Ethio­pia, rai­sed in Lon­don — no, in Ire­land I do belie­ve, and she’s here nomi­na­ted for play­ing a girl in small-town Vir­gi­nia. Ryan Gos­ling, like all of the nicest peop­le, is Cana­di­an, and Dev Patel was born in Kenya, rai­sed in Lon­don, and is here play­ing an Indian rai­sed in Tas­ma­nia. So Hol­ly­wood is craw­ling with out­si­ders and for­eig­ners. And if we kick them all out you’ll have not­hing to watch but foot­ball and mixed mar­ti­al arts, which are not the arts. / They gave me three seconds to say this, so: An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of peop­le who are dif­fe­rent from us, and let you feel what that feels like. And the­re were many, many, many power­ful per­for­man­ces this year that did exact­ly that. Breath­ta­king, com­pas­sio­na­te work. But the­re was one per­for­mance this year that stun­ned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not becau­se it was good; the­re was not­hing good about it. But it was effec­ti­ve and it did its job. It made its inten­ded audi­ence laugh, and show their teeth. It was that moment when the per­son asking to sit in the most respec­ted seat in our coun­try imi­ta­ted a dis­ab­led repor­ter. Someo­ne he outran­ked in pri­vi­le­ge, power and the capa­ci­ty to fight back. It kind of bro­ke my heart when I saw it, and I still can’t get it out of my head, becau­se it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. And this instinct to humi­lia­te, when it’s mode­led by someo­ne in the public plat­form, by someo­ne power­ful, it fil­ters down into everybody’s life, becau­se it kin­da gives per­mis­si­on for other peop­le to do the same thing. Dis­re­spect invi­tes dis­re­spect, vio­lence inci­tes vio­lence. And when the power­ful use their posi­ti­on to bul­ly others we all lose. O.K., go on with it. O.K., this brings me to the press. We need the princi­pled press to hold power to account, to call him on the car­pet for every outra­ge. That’s why our foun­ders ensh­ri­ned the press and its free­doms in the Con­sti­tu­ti­on. So I only ask the famous­ly well-hee­led Hol­ly­wood For­eign Press and all of us in our com­mu­ni­ty to join me in sup­por­ting the Com­mit­tee to Pro­tect Jour­na­lists, becau­se we’re gon­na need them going for­ward, and they’ll need us to safe­guard the truth. One more thing: Once, when I was stan­ding around on the set one day, whi­ning about some­thing — you know we were gon­na work through sup­per or the long hours or wha­te­ver, Tom­my Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a pri­vi­le­ge, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is, and we have to remind each other of the pri­vi­le­ge and the respon­si­bi­li­ty of the act of empa­thy. We should all be proud of the work Hol­ly­wood honors here tonight. / As my friend, the dear depar­ted Princess Leia, said to me once, take your bro­ken heart, make it into art. — stop / fund­ort

ping

///

überall liegen Bücher herum

ping
ping
ping

echo : 2.26 — Frü­her ein­mal exis­tier­ten Bücher, deren Sei­ten mit­ein­an­der ver­bun­den waren. Bevor man die Sei­ten die­ser Bücher lesen konn­te, muss­te man sie von­ein­ader tren­nen. Selt­sa­mer­wei­se hat­te ich ihre Exis­tenz ver­ges­sen, bis ich gera­de eben sol­che Bücher in einem Text von Natha­lie Sar­rau­te bemerk­te. Aber viel­leicht ist das Wort ver­ges­sen in die­sem Zusam­men­hang nicht rich­tig gewählt, ich hat­te jah­re­lang nicht an sie gedacht, im Gehei­men waren sie ver­mut­lich immer anwe­send gewe­sen. Sofort begann ich damit, die Umge­bung mei­ner Erin­ne­rung zu erkun­den. Ich ent­deck­te eine Tan­te. Wenn die Tan­te zu Besuch kam, küss­te sie mich auf die Stirn. Es gab dann immer Lauch­sup­pe, weil sie einen Gemü­se­händ­ler kann­te, der ihr Lauch­stan­gen schenk­te. Die­se Tan­te also, deren Gesicht zer­furcht war von unzäh­li­gen Fal­ten, schenk­te mir ein­mal ein Buch genau die­ser erwähn­ten Art, ein Buch, des­sen Sei­ten mit­ein­an­der ver­bun­den waren, so dass ich jede Sei­te mit einer Sche­re zunächst von der nächs­ten tren­nen muss­te. Das Buch war kein Kin­der­buch gewe­sen, ich hat­te noch nicht sehr viel mit Büchern zu tun zu die­sem Zeit­punkt, aber Natha­lie Sar­rau­te, die damals unge­fähr in mei­nem Alter gewe­sen sein könn­te, in einem Alter, als mich die Tan­te mit den Lauch­stan­gen noch besuch­te. Sie notier­te: Es lie­gen über­all Bücher her­um, in allen Zim­mern, auf den Möbeln und sogar auf dem Boden, Bücher, die Mama und Kola gebracht haben oder die mit der Post gekom­men sind … klei­ne­re, mitt­le­re und gro­ße …Ich neh­me die Neu­an­kömm­lin­ge in Augen­schein, ich schät­ze die Mühe, die jedes erfor­dern wird, die Zeit, die es mich kos­ten wird … Ich wäh­le eins aus und set­ze mich mit dem auf­ge­schla­ge­nen Buch auf den Knien hin, ich umklam­me­re das brei­te Papier­mes­ser aus grau aus­se­hen­dem Horn, und ich fan­ge an … zuerst zer­trennt das waa­ge­recht gehal­te­ne Papier­mes­ser den obe­ren Falz der vier zusam­men­hän­gen­den Dop­pel­sei­ten, dann senkt es sich, rich­tet sich wie­der auf und glei­tet zwi­schen die bei­den Sei­ten, die nur noch längs­seits mit­ein­an­der ver­bun­den sind … dann kom­men die „leich­ten“ Sei­ten, sie sind an ihrem lan­gen Rand offen und bra­chen nur noch oben getrennt wer­den. Und wie­der die vier „schwie­ri­gen“ Sei­ten … und dann vier „leich­te“, und dann vier „schwie­ri­ge“, und so wei­ter, immer schnel­ler, mei­ne Hand wird müde, mein Kopf wird schwer, er brummt, mir wird ein wenig schwind­lig, … „Hör jetzt auf, mein Lieb­ling, das reicht, hast du wirk­lich nichts Inter­es­san­te­res zu tun? Ich wer­de beim Lesen sel­ber auf­schnei­den, das stört mich nicht, ich mache das ganz auto­ma­tisch …“ Es kommt jedoch nicht in Fra­ge, dass ich auf­ge­be. — stop / Natha­lie Sar­rau­te Kind­heit — aus der fran­zö­si­schen Spra­che über­setzt von Eri­ka und Elmar Tophoven

ping

///

chinatown : kandierte enten

2

nord­pol : 2.06 — Über die Brook­lyn Bridge nach Man­hat­tan. Wun­der­ba­res Licht, klar und sanft. Da ist ein Wind, der aus dem Lan­des­in­ne­ren kommt, ein bestän­di­ger, kal­ter Strom, gegen den sich Möwen in einer Wei­se stem­men, dass sie in der Luft zu ste­hen schei­nen. Hel­le Augen, grau, blau, gelb, das Gefie­der dicht und fein wie Pelz. Ich fol­ge kurz dar­auf einem alten chi­ne­si­schen Mann durch Chi­na­town. Tack, tack, tack, das Geräusch sei­nes Stocks auf dem Boden, ein Faden von Zeit über enge Stra­ßen. Links und rechts des Weges, schma­le Läden in roten, in gol­de­nen Far­ben, Waren, die Har­mo­nie bedeu­ten, Bän­der, Fächer, lächeln­de Mas­ken. Ich rie­che heu­te nichts, oder die Gerü­che, wenn sie noch exis­tie­ren, bewe­gen sich dicht über den Boden hin, Mor­chel­ber­ge, getrock­ne­te Schwäm­me, Muscheln, Nüs­se, Algen­we­del, Krab­ben, zwei Hum­mer­tie­re, sie leben noch, sind für 20 Dol­lar zu haben. Im Restau­rant nahe der Mott­street, eine mil­de Enten­sup­pe gegen den Abend zu. Mes­ser der Köche, die vor mei­nen spei­sen­den Augen laut­los durch hal­be Schwei­ne flit­zen. Gebra­te­ne Enten­kör­per, glän­zend, als wären sie von der Art kan­dier­ter Früch­te, bau­meln in den Fens­tern. Dann Däm­me­rung und Wär­me im Bauch und das Schwin­gen der Brü­cke noch in den Bei­nen. – stop

///

augenzeit

2

 

alpha : 0.03 — Im Regen her­um­spa­ziert, wollt ein Paar neu­er Augen besor­gen, hat­te solan­ge Zeit Papie­re und Zei­chen betrach­tet, dass ich blind für jede Bedeu­tung gewor­den war. Im Wald tropf­te das Was­ser von den Bäu­men, eine Amsel lief auf feuch­ten Wegen vor mir her, da und dort Spu­ren von Schnee. — Schnee­ku­chen. — Schnee­sup­pe. —  Schnee­bü­cher. -  Nach einer Stun­de dann waren mir neue Augen gewach­sen, ich kehr­te zurück und jetzt ist schon wie­der heim­lich Nacht gewor­den. Merk­wür­dig, wie man einen Abend lang in einem Zim­mer auf dem Boden sit­zen kann und den­ken und zugleich nichts den­ken. Nur noch atmen. Und die Augen bewegen.